hifructosemag

littlelimpstiff14u2:

The amazing Dice sculptures of Tony Cragg

From a distance, it’s difficult to tell that these abstract sculptures are even more impressive than they first appear. As viewers near each piece, it quickly becomes evident that the large, organic shapes are completely covered with dice. In the collection, Germany-based artist Anthony Cragg used only small, black and white cubes to construct the surface of each unique form. He did not find himself limited to the hard, square edges, and used thousands of the objects to create a variety of mesmerizing curves that mimic nature. ( Quote from mymodernmet.com )

  • Tony Cragg is a British visual artist who works mainly as a sculptor. He was the director of the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf until August 2013.

1988 Turner Prize winner

2002 Piepenbrock Award for Sculpture Awarded the CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire)

2009 Honorary doctor of the Royal College of Arts

2012 Cologne Fine art Award

http://www.tony-cragg.com/

bpod-mrc
bpod-mrc:

31 January 2014
Single-Minded Metabolism
Rainforests, bristling with life, are humankind’s natural pharmacy. The rich biodiversity found in these regions alone has been exploited to give us over 100 prescription drugs and more than two thirds of cancer medicines. And it’s within this fertile world that scientists have identified the latest, if somewhat unlikely, potential source of future medicines – the three-toed sloth (pictured). This jungle-dwelling creature sports a dense furry coat, an ecosystem within an ecosystem that supports a wide range of life, including over 80 fungi species. When tested in the laboratory, many of these fungi attacked parasites – including one responsible for malaria – numerous bacteria and even breast cancer cells. Studying these organisms may therefore yield new insights and tools for fighting a wide range of diseases. So, while sloths, as their names suggests are not always in a hurry, they may provide us with a fast-track to better health.
Written by Jan Piotrowski
—
Image courtesy of Marie and Alistair Knock on Flickr Originally published under a Creative Commons licence Research published in PLOS One, January 2014

bpod-mrc:

31 January 2014

Single-Minded Metabolism

Rainforests, bristling with life, are humankind’s natural pharmacy. The rich biodiversity found in these regions alone has been exploited to give us over 100 prescription drugs and more than two thirds of cancer medicines. And it’s within this fertile world that scientists have identified the latest, if somewhat unlikely, potential source of future medicines – the three-toed sloth (pictured). This jungle-dwelling creature sports a dense furry coat, an ecosystem within an ecosystem that supports a wide range of life, including over 80 fungi species. When tested in the laboratory, many of these fungi attacked parasites – including one responsible for malaria – numerous bacteria and even breast cancer cells. Studying these organisms may therefore yield new insights and tools for fighting a wide range of diseases. So, while sloths, as their names suggests are not always in a hurry, they may provide us with a fast-track to better health.

Written by Jan Piotrowski

Image courtesy of Marie and Alistair Knock on Flickr
Originally published under a Creative Commons licence
Research published in PLOS One, January 2014

bpod-mrc
bpod-mrc:

28 November 2013
Poo Pills
It might sound revolting, but doctors could one day prescribe poo pills. Sometimes, when antibiotics have eliminated ‘friendly’ bacteria, the gut’s microbial community is overrun with a bacterium called Clostridium difficile (falsely coloured orange) that causes chronic diarrhoea and can sometimes be fatal. In the past couple of years, an unusual treatment has proven highly effective: faecal transplants – in which a liquid stool sample from a healthy gut is squirted into a patient’s colon – eradicate C. difficile by restoring the normal bacterial balance. But medical regulations and squeamishness prevent many doctors from performing the procedure. As an easier alternative, researchers are testing tablets containing concentrated faecal bacteria from healthy donors. In one trial, the tablets cured all 27 of the patients on which they were tested, raising the possibility that poo pills – which have no smell or taste – could become a more palatable option for patients with severe gut infections.
Written by Daniel Cossins
—
Image by David Goulding Wellcome Images  Originally published under a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC 2.0) Research by Professor Thomas Louie, University of Calgary, Canada

Modern meds

bpod-mrc:

28 November 2013

Poo Pills

It might sound revolting, but doctors could one day prescribe poo pills. Sometimes, when antibiotics have eliminated ‘friendly’ bacteria, the gut’s microbial community is overrun with a bacterium called Clostridium difficile (falsely coloured orange) that causes chronic diarrhoea and can sometimes be fatal. In the past couple of years, an unusual treatment has proven highly effective: faecal transplants – in which a liquid stool sample from a healthy gut is squirted into a patient’s colon – eradicate C. difficile by restoring the normal bacterial balance. But medical regulations and squeamishness prevent many doctors from performing the procedure. As an easier alternative, researchers are testing tablets containing concentrated faecal bacteria from healthy donors. In one trial, the tablets cured all 27 of the patients on which they were tested, raising the possibility that poo pills – which have no smell or taste – could become a more palatable option for patients with severe gut infections.

Written by Daniel Cossins

Image by David Goulding
Wellcome Images
Originally published under a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC 2.0)
Research by Professor Thomas Louie, University of Calgary, Canada

Modern meds